Eating China Chinese Food
Main: Chinese Food Articles about Chinese Food Chinese food Facts Chinese Food Recipes Chinese Food Books Main menu
  Learn about Chinese cuisine. With cooking tips, interesting snippets,
blog, and authentic dishes from China and Taiwan. | 中國食跡
About Chinese Food Comment on Chinese Food About Chinese Food
 
 
 
Dongpo Pork  

Dongpo Pork 東坡肉 (dong-1 po-1 rou-4) Hangzhou's trademark dish. To eat dongpo pork is to begin to understand the role of fat in making meat taste good.



 

The dish is named after revered Song Dynasty poet, artist and calligrapher Su Dongpo, who is supposed to have invented, or at least inspired it. The meat should be so tender that you can quite easily pry it away in small pieces with chopsticks. As it is made from a slab of pork belly, there is a lot of fat, but the lengthy cooking time (3-1/2 hours) results in fat sans much of its greasiness. Eat as little of the fat as you choose. The accompanying ginger and plainly cooked broccoli also help offset the fat. You will need at least four hours to make dongpo pork during which time it is simmered twice, braised, sautéd and steamed.

Serves 4

Ingredients
1 kg (2.2 lb) piece pork belly
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
1 tablespoon tea leaves
4 stalks spring onions
7 cm (3") length fresh, young ginger, sliced lengthways into matchstick widths
Optional: 300 g (11 oz) broccoli, cut into small florets

Sauce Ingredients
1 cup water
8 cloves garlic, lightly crushed
5 slices old ginger (or 7 slices young ginger)
1 tablespoon black peppercorns
4 tablespoons soy sauce
2 tablespoons yellow wine (e.g. Shaoxing wine)
1/2 tablespoon sesame oil
2 tablespoons sugar
Thickening: 1 teaspoon corn flour, 1 tablespoon water, stirred well before use

Method

  1. Blanch pork in a pot of boiling water. Throw out water.
  2. Put pork back in pot and cover with water. Bring to a boil, and simmer for 30 minutes.
  3. Heat a wok and add sauce ingredients. Mix well and bring to a boil. Add pork and cook each surface for a few minutes over a medium heat. Remove pork and drain well. Pour remaining sauce into a small saucepan and set aside.
  4. Clean and drain wok. Heat vegetable oil to a medium heat. Fry pork on all sides until it is well browned, making sure skin side is a little crispy.
  5. Steep tea leaves in hot water for a couple of minutes, remove and set aside. Place pork in pot of water again–topping up water if necessary. Add tea leaves and simmer for 30 minutes.
  6. Place scallion stalks on bottom of a steamer. Transfer pork to steamer. Steam for 2 hours, turning pork after 1 hour (because of long steaming time, you may need to replenish steamer water).
  7. Add broccoli to steamer for final 5 minutes of cooking time (boil it separately for 3 minutes if there is no room in steamer.
  8. Remove pork to a serving dish and arrange broccoli around it. Reheat sauce in saucepan, adding and stirring in thickener. Pour over pork and serve.
  9. Garnish with young ginger slivers, which are meant to be eaten.

Notes: The leftover simmer water makes a good pork stock.

Read more about pork:
China, a Nation of Pork Eaters

 
 
Did you try this recipe? Was it clear? Tell us how the dish turned out; was it great, disappointing, or even a bloody disaster? Post a Comment
 
 
 
 
 
   
   

 

 
  Twitter
Facebook
 

Comment

Featured Chinese Food Recipe
Tasty Asian pork & bamboo soup  

Bamboo and Pork Soup
筍子排骨湯

 
Featured Chinese Food Snippets

Why Pork is a Synonym for Meat

China consumes far more pork than any other country, and not surprisingly has the largest pig population in the world. Pork so dominates the meat market that if a dish name includes the word meat, you can be fairly certain that pork is what is meant. more

More Chinese Food Facts

Chinese Cooking Tips