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Chinese chafing dish recipe  

Fried Tofu with Pork Belly and Mushrooms 鐵板豆腐 (tiě bǎn dòufu) Bubbling away on your table, chafing dishes like this one from Taiwan, are always fun to eat.



 

Serves 4

Ingredients
250 g (9 oz) extra firm tofu
80 g (3 oz) preserved pork belly, sliced thinly (bacon is a good substitute)
4 leek stems, cut into 3 cm (1") lengths
4 fresh shiitake mushrooms, cut into chunks
1 large chilli pepper, sliced diagonally into 3 or 4 pieces
2 teaspoons vegetable oil

Sauce
1 cup chicken stock
1 tablespoon soy sauce
1 tablespoon Taiwan rice wine
1/2 teaspoon of white sugar
1/2 teaspoon hot bean paste
Pepper, dash
1/2 tablespoon sesame oil

Method

  1. Spread leeks and mushrooms in chafing dish.
  2. Cut tofu into slices about 2 cm (3/4") thick, Add oil to non-stick pan, and brown tofu slightly on a low to medium heat. Remove to chafing dish.
  3. Fry pork in a wok with a little oil at a medium heat until fragrant and slightly crisp. Remove and sprinkle over tofu.
  4. Add chilli to chafing dish.
  5. Except for sesame oil, add sauce ingredients to wok. Bring to a boil, then simmer for 5 minutes. Add sesame oil, and pour sauce over other ingredients in chafing dish.
  6. Light chafing dish burner, and serve. Eat as soon as sauce starts to bubble. Turn off burner after a few minutes to avoid overcooking. 

Notes:
Taiwan rice wine is quite different than the 'yellow' or Shaoxing wine in China. Mirin is the best substitute. For this dish, however, so little wine is used that you will not go too far wrong with any type of rice wine.

 
   
   

 

 
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